The “Great Crusade” of D-Day

Today, 75 years ago, Allied armies stormed the beaches of Normandy, France, to begin the final liberation of Europe from Nazi tyranny…May we in the West today become worthy of our ancestors.  Because right now—we are not.

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Joshua Charles
Becoming Catholic #12: Why Acts 15 Led Me to the Catholic Church

Long before I had even read a single word by a Catholic apologist or a Church Father, I read the Bible’s account of the Council of Jerusalem and simply had no way to fit it into any of a variety of protestant frameworks for a “biblical church.”  Further study eventually led me to conclude that the Church, from its earliest days, was (1) Catholic; (2) Authoritative; (3) Infallible; (4) Apostolic; and (5) Hierarchical in a way that matched the Catholic Church to this very day.

I was thus faced with a fundamental question—since the Bible clearly portrays a Church of this nature, and never says those features ended, where is that Church today?

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This Nazi Mocked God—God Got the Last Laugh

Goebbels mocked the idea that the Old Testament curses of Yahweh against the enemies of the Jewish people were of any concern…But not even six years later, the “Thousand Year Reich” was in the ash heap of history, and the State of Israel was reborn as the national home of the Jewish people after their nearly 2,000 years of exile from the Land of Israel.

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Solzhenitsyn's Chilling Warning to College Students Tempted by Socialism

“All you freedom-loving “left-wing” thinkers in the West!  You left laborites!  You progressive American, German, and French students!  As far as you are concerned, none of this amounts to much.  As far as you are concerned, this whole book of mine is a waste of effort.  You may suddenly understand it all someday—but only when you yourselves hear “hands behind your backs there!” and step ashore on our Archipelago.”

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This Ancient Roman Senator Described the Downfall of His Republic—And it Sounds A Lot Like Ours

Cicero’s warnings about the downfall of his own Republic, delivered just several years before it finally fell with Caesar’s “crossing of the Rubicon,” should be of the utmost import to those of us who are citizens of the American Republic, it’s most closely related political posterity.

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Medieval Muslim Historian: Low Taxes Build, High Taxes Destroy Civilization

Ibn Khaldûn isn’t exactly a household name—but he should be, especially for conservatives, classical liberals, and libertarian…In short, Khaldûn believed that low taxes helped build civilization, and high taxes helped destroy civilization.  Not only that, but he observed that lower taxes tended to bring in more revenue, while higher taxes tended to bring in less revenue.

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Did God Prevent the Rebuilding of the Jewish Temple?

I recently discovered an extremely fascinating historical event I had never heard about: apparently, there was a serious attempt to rebuild the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem after it was destroyed in AD 70.  Not only that, but the attempt was thwarted by an odd series of seemingly cataclysmic events: fire burst forth from the foundations, along with a great earthquake, preventing the workers from completing their work.  The project was abandoned.  Some accounts include assertions that the sign of the cross appeared in the sky, as well as on the garments of the workers.

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Faith of the Founders #5: Jefferson, God and Inaugurals

While Thomas Jefferson’s religious beliefs are the subject of ongoing and fierce debate, it is nonetheless surprising how religious his two most public statements as President of the United States were.  They acknowledge God; they invoke His aid; they compare the United States with ancient Israel; they appeal to an overruling Providence; and they assert religious liberty, all at the same time.

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Becoming Catholic #11: Which “gospel”? Which “biblical”?

The two meta-questions that framed all my other questions about the “vexing verses” were: what is actually “the gospel,” and what is actually “biblical”?  I was haunted by these questions for more than a decade before I read a single word by a Catholic.  But my love of the Bible, my burning desire to understand it, my inability to make sense of so much of it within a protestant framework, alongside the appeals made to it as the authority behind wildly divergent and contradictory theologies, compelled me to dig deeper.

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Was John Adams a Zionist?

So what was Adams? Philo-Semitic? Anti-Semitic?  Zionist?  Most historical figures don’t fit neatly into our present categories, and the same is true of John Adams.  But there can be no doubt that he was a great admirer of the Jews, and that he looked forward to the day when they would be re-established as a nation in their ancient homeland of Judea.

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Becoming Catholic #10: Church Authority, and Saint Ignatius the Red Pill, Part 5—Roman Finale

It is beyond doubt that Ignatius speaks of the Roman church in ways he simply does not speak of any church.  Most significantly, he speaks of her as one who teaches, confirms, instructs, and enjoins other churches, and as one not only deserving of, but indeed gifted with, unique honors and graces both from God, and the other churches. Ignatius thus serves as one of the earliest witnesses to the primacy of the Roman church.

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Becoming Catholic #9: The Church Fathers, and the Christian Sacrifice of the Eucharist

One of the things that comes through so clearly, so universally in the Church Fathers, is the idea that at the center of Christian worship is a sacrifice—the Eucharist, the bread and wine that has become the Body and Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ.  In the ultimate picture of grace, God Himself has made it possible for us to offer Him to Him, and doing so cleanses us, in some mysterious way.  This basic belief was present from the very beginning of Christianity.

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Joshua Charles